Multihull Capsize Recovery

Multihulls can be light and fast but cruising ones must never capsize: They stay inverted.
Single hulled yachts can be self-righting and seaworthy, some large and small ones can survive storms and work to windward in gales but to be quick they need deep weighted keels and a wide hull. Built in buoyancy can avoid sinking but they are outperformed by multihulls.
Can a multihull be seaworthy? Could one work to windward in a gale or sail on when mid Atlantic breakers flatten her? What about an automatic system for capsize recovery? Could a multihull heave to in heavy weather and work slowly to windward like a Contessa? Probably not, but perhaps it could be as seaworthy as the offshore racing fleet.

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The Split Junk Rig

Back in 2002, AYRS Member Slieve MacGalliard was looking for a way to improve the one weak point of the modern western Junk rig – the windward performance. His conclusion was that camber is needed right to the luff of the sail, a feature that is difficult to achieve with the standard rig, which is normally pulled aft. One possible idea was to build a cambered rig with a lot of sail balance forward of the mast and split the sail in way of the mast so that the camber would be the same on both tacks and not distorted by the mast.

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